Westminster diary w/b 21st October

Monday

The Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs select committee (PACAC) took evidence from the Minister for the Constitution, Kevin Stewart MP. It was mostly around voter identification, the regulation of spending and the use of social media. I am not convinced about the need for voter identification cards in case they are a barrier to people voting. Regulation gets trashed on a regular basis and fines don’t solve it. And social media is miles ahead of the legislation required to make it safe and legal. The Minister didn’t address any of these facts. The APPG on Catalonia heard from their Foreign Affairs minister, Alfred Bosch. His plea was simple. In these turbulent times the Catalan government want to sit down and talk. That is the only way to resolve the issues. He urged us to use all the diplomatic channels that we can. In the Chamber the UK Government were attempting to rerun the debate they had and lost on Saturday. The speaker schooled them on parliamentary process pointing out that the avenue they were pursuing, that of significant change in circumstances, was not appropriate as they had applied for the debate 21 minutes after the last one ended and nothing significant had happened in that time. I sat in a delegated committee on gas tariffs. It was not controversial and passed unopposed.

Tuesday

Not content with one session a week, PACAC met to take evidence from expert witnesses on the role of the speaker. I should have been forewarned that it was going to be a long session when I read the brief which started ‘by the civil war period’. As it turned out it lasted just over three hours but was hugely entertaining and informative. I met with representatives of Health Poverty Action to update them on drugs policy and see how we can work together to improve the current policies. I was in the chamber for the Prime Minister’s speech on the Withdrawal Agreement Bill. I get the feeling that he is light on detail and heavy on promises. I met with Digital Scotland to discuss broadband rollout in Inverclyde and the R100 programme which aims to provide 100% access to superfast broadband by 2021. The evening was scheduled to run until 22:30 but the votes at 19:00 did not go the way the UK Government wanted. The Prime Minister had wanted to railroad ahead with plans to implement legislation that will drag Scotland out of the EU, and inflict lasting harm on its economy, small and large businesses, public services, and people’s livelihoods, all the SNP MPs voted against this. The UK Government then paused the bill!

Wednesday

I met with Amazon to discuss the future of the plant in Inverclyde and working conditions for employees. I was on the order paper for Prime Minister’s Questions and took great consideration composing my question. They don’t come along often, and I didn’t want to squander it. The government have stock answers to many questions, and I wanted to avoid those. I asked about the availability and funding of medical cannabis. It’s an issue that this Prime Minister has been more open to than his predecessor. He responded to me by saying “I will take it up personally with him” and that is an offer I shall certainly accept. I met up with a representative of Virgin Media to discuss the continued quest to roll out the best possible local service and representatives of NoteMachine, the second largest ATM provider in the UK. We discussed the increasing policy of charging for the use of ATMs.

Thursday

I had an interview with the author J.S. Rafaeli. He is researching drug policy reform for an article for vice.com which says its remit is ‘original reporting on everything that matters’. I then spoke with the Royal Mail. They highlighted the dramatic increase in parcel delivery, which fitted in well with my discussions with Amazon on Wednesday. The Queen’s speech went through and a statement was made that a General Election will be voted on next Monday. The Tory plan is to push through a bad deal with minimum scrutiny. We aren’t falling for it.

Friday

In the morning I had meetings with constituents and in the afternoon, I met with Financial Fitness and visited Belville gardens to catch up with the Our Place Our Future Roadshow. In between I met up with the Greenock Telegraph to highlight my appeal to retailers to stop selling Fireworks to the public.

 

Westminster diary w/b 14th October

Monday

The State Opening of parliament is the opportunity for the UK government to lay out their plans for the coming session. It is a grandiose ceremony of pomp and circumstance. The Queen sends Black Rod to summon us commoners up to the Lords but we shut the door on Black Rod and pretend not to let her in. But then we do. We always do. Then we go to the Lords and the Queen sitting on a gold throne in the House of Lords reads a speech given to her by the Prime Minister. I should say that is after the cellars have been searched by the Yeoman of the Guard and a hostage has been taken and held in case we try and keep the Queen. The Queen’s speech is then debated on over a few days and practically nobody attends. If you think that’s strange the week was just beginning. I joined protestors outside the Spanish Embassy in a show of solidarity for the yellow ribbon campaign to highlight the imprisonment of political prisoners.

Tuesday

There is an urgent question on the prison sentences handed down by the Spanish Supreme Court to the nine political prisoners. Some people may feel this is not an issue that should concern elected members of the UK parliament, but it is sufficiently relevant for the speaker to grant the question. Many people condemn the sentences as an affront to democracy but the Minister responding on behalf of the government doesn’t get it. I quoted Dr Martin Luther King when he said ‘our lives begin to end the day we stay silent about things that matter’. I then met up with a delegation of Kenyan parliamentarians who have grave concerns about UK owned gambling companies that are targeting a new vulnerable market place in Kenya. We shall be monitoring this situation closely. I had a meeting with the Chief Executive of Scottish Power Energy Network and we discussed electric vehicles and the infrastructure required to support them.

Wednesday

It’s my turn to speak on the Queen’s speech and I question the Minister on closures of coastguard centres and job centres in Inverclyde along with the government’s reluctance to support medical cannabis and drug consumption rooms. For a six-minute speech I had to be in attendance for the best part of six hours. It’s nonsense just utter nonsense. We are supposed to be using our time wisely to work towards a constructive outcome regarding Brexit and instead we are going through the motions.

Thursday

I start the day on College Green giving an interview to the Spanish TV station Antena 3. They have grave concerns over the image that Spain is portraying across the globe regarding the political prisoners and the violence we are seeing from the National Police against peaceful protestors. Rumours around deals with the European Union are in abundance and change by the hour. When we finally get to read what has been offered it has changed very little from what has already been voted down. This time however a deal has been done to keep Northern Ireland in the single market, with a few caveats. The DUP are refusing to back it and it will now be debated and voted on Saturday. The UK Parliament has only sat three times on a Saturday, once during game the Second World War, once during the Suez crisis and again during the Falklands War. Brexit will be the fourth time. That’s how big the mess is. I grab a flight home.

Friday

I catch an early train to Edinburgh as I am speaking at the 5th LEAHN (Law Enforcement and HIV Network) consultation on police, drugs and harm reduction. It’s a privilege to be asked to speak along with the experts in this field. We shall only address the issue of problematic drug use when politicians listen to the experts from academia, recovery and lived experience. I catch a tea time flight from Edinburgh back to London. On Saturday we shall debate on the deal and the amendments. Who knows where that shall take us?

Westminster diary w/b 30th September

Monday

Today I caught up with representatives of Link Housing to discuss the ongoing issue over the construction of houses on the old Ravenscraig site. There has been a lot of speculation and further clarification is being sought regarding the condition of the land before any housing is constructed. As I was flying into London at 19:15 it was already pitch black and I could not help but thinking that this could be the start of a long dark winter of discontent.

Tuesday

The Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Select Committee held a closed door meeting to discuss our pending reports and future programme. Trying to develop a future programme in these times is like trying to nail a blancmange to a wall. I attended a meeting of elected members where we had an extremely intense conversation and grave concerns were expressed around Brexit possibilities. It was played out to a suitable backdrop of thunder, lightning and rain thrashing against the windows of a wood panelled room within a faux gothic stone crumbling building. It felt very much like the 31st of October had arrived and Halloween was already upon us. I attended an urgent question on the situation in the Yemen. The UK Government still can’t acknowledge that the UK arms sales to Saudi Arabia Makes us culpable in the destruction and heartache we are witnessing.

Wednesday

PMQ was a knock about affair with Dominic Raab and Dianne Abbott filling the roles of Punch and Judy. The Prime Minister obviously believes it is more important to attend the Conservative and Unionist party conference than attend the House of Commons and be held to account for the shambolic process that is damaging and will continue to damage Scotland as we are pulled out of the EU against the wishes of the Scottish electorate. It was good to hear the father of the house (Ken Clark) chastise the Prime Minister and his unwillingness to work with the UK Parliament. I intervened in the domestic abuse bill to highlight the need to explicitly include sexual abuse in the bill so victims can receive the help and support required. Business was collapsing early and so I grabbed the 17:05 flight home.

Thursday

I started with constituency work in my office and then attended the extremely busy jobs fair in the town hall. It was good to see Diode Incorporated represented and hear how things are progressing since they bought Texas Instruments. Tens of millions of pounds have been invested and more people are being recruited. Most of the afternoon was taken up by constituency cases including housing, welfare, travel and health issues.

Friday

In the morning I had meetings with council officers and Network rail. The afternoon consisted of surgeries in Greenock and Kilmacolm.

Westminster diary w/b 9th September

Monday

Up at the crack of dawn to catch a red eye to London. A British Airways pilots’ strike was causing a deal of disruption but thankfully my flight was unaffected as I needed to be on the estate early. It’s another day of making history at Westminster. In truth every day at Westminster seems to be a day when uncharted waters are being negotiated but this one turned out be a cracker. Prior to the chamber sitting at 14:30 I have an internal SNP MP briefing meeting. An event that used to take place once a week is becoming more like a daily affair. Things are changing so quickly, and the opportunities change shape by the hour that regular discussion is required. I then have the select committee for public affairs and the constitution. We have Mark Sedwill and John Manzoni in front of us. They are the two most senior members of the civil service, the impartial civil service that support the cabinet office and prime minister’s office regardless of their own political views. I can’t help but think that must be incredibly hard at the best of times. Performing that task in today’s political climate takes great skill especially when there are people like Dominic Cummings sacking special advisers to the Exchequer. We asked about the legality of prorogation and the behaviour allowed during purdah. They are as you would expect consummate professionals extremely skilled in answering all questions. The same can’t be said of the current bunch running the UK government. And so to the chamber. At 7:15pm we had a Standing Order No. 24 motion: Prorogation and disclosure of communication. The motion proposed by Dominic Grieve including a ‘Humble Address’ requiring publication of documents related to the Government’s decision to prorogue parliament, and on no-deal planning under Operation Yellowhammer. The SNP voted AYE and the motion was carried 311 – 302. At 00:18 (on Tuesday morning): There was a motion that there shall be an early parliamentary general election. Proposed by the Prime Minister under the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act. The SNP abstained and although the motion was carried 293 – 46, this did not meet the threshold of two-thirds of all MPs to take effect under the Act. I abstained because this is a trap being set for a General Election under terms that suit the no deal Brexiteers. For the record I would welcome a General Election and when the time is right, I shall vote for it. I didn’t hang around for the ceremony to prorogue Parliament, instead I left the building and walked through the crowds of protesters that were still there at 1am and continued to my flat. Sleep came easy.

Tuesday

Everything has changed so it’s a scramble for transport home. The BA strike continues so it’s 18:30 before I can catch a flight. I spend my days writing, reading and catching up on correspondence.

Wednesday

I spent the morning talking to traders in Kempock Street and was impressed by their approach to the High Street of the year awards. Many units are now displaying posters and I am looking forward to the judges visiting on the 17th. Fortunately, I am not in charge of the car parking arrangements. In the afternoon I caught up with constituents and was delighted to be informed by one that we had won his case on Universal Credit and his payment has been reinstated and he had received over £2,500 in back payments. These victories for constituents are a huge part of an MPs job and each one is received with great joy. I took the opportunity to attend the SNP councillors group meeting which enhances my understanding of local issues and the machinery of the council. In the evening I attended the Inverclyde Historical Society for at talk on the British Constitution by Jim Carmichael. It was extremely interesting, and I hope to attend some future talks.

Thursday

A day consumed in the office with constituent’s cases and catching up with local organisations. Unexpected recess is easily reallocated to local people and events.

Friday

I had one of my regular meetings with the local jobcentre. In a professional capacity I am not seeking employment elsewhere. In the afternoon I went up to Captain Street to the Inverclyde men’s Shed where they use their experience and skills to the benefit of the local community. I had surgeries later in the afternoon.

On Sunday, I shall be doing the Alzheimer’s memory walk along with Stuart McMillan MSP.

Westminster diary w/b 2nd September

Monday

Last day of recess before heading back to Westminster. I met with the new management of the Oak mall and was heartened to hear about their plans to consolidate their investment in Inverclyde. High street retail has changed almost beyond recognition and we must move with the times. Combined with the announcement of £3 million pounds being spent to reinvigorate West Blackhall street, including £1.5 million from Sustrans Scotland, hopefully that area of the town is on the up. To achieve its potential, it will need to benefit from the cruise ship traffic and the new reception centre for cruise ships will help that. On that note it is good to see Inchgreen in operation building the floating pontoon for cruise ships to berth at. I travelled to London on a late flight with some colleagues including Dr Phillipa Whitford who despite being in a wheel chair having broken her ankle was required to travel to take part in important votes.

Tuesday

The All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Gambling Related Harm met to prepare for an important evidence session the next day. In the chamber there were two government statements. The Prime Minister bumbled through a statement about the G7. I am not one for the pomp and ceremony of Westminster. I am comfortable with a less formal approach but to work effectively certain codes of conduct and levels of professionalism are required. It is not just my observation that the current Prime Minister has none of these abilities. His statement was a disgrace. The Duchy of Lancaster, Michael Gove then delivered a statement on leaving the E.U.   I attended an event arranged by Transform Drugs in conjunction with the APPG on Drug Policy Reform. Speakers from Canada and Massachusetts outlined the routes they had taken to legalise cannabis. It is worthwhile noting that if you travelled from Alaska down to Guatemala every country or state you travel through has legalised cannabis. Importantly, in different ways to suit their own local concerns and needs. When Washington D.C. voted to legalise cannabis, 242 out of 243 districts said yes, the other said no, by nine votes. In the chamber there was a Standing Order 24 debate on the E.U. withdrawal. It is designed to protect the UK from leaving without a deal. The government opposed it but lost. They also managed to lose their majority and remove the whip from 21 rebel MPs. The Leader of the House, Jacob Rees Mogg lounged about on the front benches following his Prime Minster’s lead showing utter contempt for the proceedings. Their public schoolboy, superior than though arrogance is now openly on display at every opportunity.

Wednesday

Prime Minister’s Question Time. The Prime Minister was so appalling bad that he made the leader of the opposition look good. He blustered, bumbled and even tried to bully his way through but it was clear to everyone that we have a Prime Minister who is incompetent and incoherent. In the evening the bill to ensure we don’t leave without a deal passed its next stage and headed up to the House of Lords. All things being equal it shall return on Monday for the 3rd reading and ten go for Royal Assent. In an attempt to thwart this the government called for a general election. Under the terms of the fixed term parliament act they need two thirds of all MPs (434) to vote for this motion and they only got 298. I did not vote for a general election currently as it was only a means to an end. When the time comes, I shall vote for a general election.

I acknowledged the spirit of inventiveness and ingenuity that these times call for by wearing my James Watt tartan tie which was gifted to me by the Provost of Inverclyde Council.

Thursday

After all the shenanigans of the past two days business was slow. I did get taken during an urgent question on HS2 and asked if the government could confirm that HS2 is still planned to extend to Scotland as this was the original plan when it was announced in January 2009. He couldn’t confirm this despite the parliamentary under Secretary of State telling me it would in a Westminster Hall debate last July. I caught the 20:35 flight home.

Friday

In the morning I had meetings with local traders and the GMB trade union. In the afternoon I had surgeries until 5pm.

Westminster diary w/b 22nd July

Monday

Down to London to witness the last few days of Theresa May’s tenure as Prime Minister. Security around the estate has increased and temperatures are soaring as London experiences a heatwave. It’s going to be an uncomfortable week in many ways. I recorded radio interviews on the topic of overdose prevention centres for Global Radio.

Tuesday

The select committee on Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs took evidence from the Electoral Commission as part of our ongoing inquiry into electoral law. We also discussed our future programme and I am hopeful that Citizens Assemblies will be considered. I know committee members have very different views on this subject and that usually results in a robust inquiry and a balanced report. The All Party Parliamentary Group on Catalonia met with representatives of the Catalonian independence movement. I only mention that as I have kept all my contact with them in the public domain. On such occasions I am usually followed and photographed by somebody from the Spanish authorities. I have no idea why they would do such a thing but recently disclosed papers have contained my name and photographs of me at events. The big news of the day was that Boris Johnson was the new leader of the Conservative and Unionist Party.

Wednesday

Questions to the outgoing Secretary of State for Scotland, David Mundell, was a lively prelude to the big show later that day. Mr Mundell swore his allegiance to the incoming Prime Minister, Boris Johnson. It was a futile attempt to hang onto his job and everyone could see that. Prime Ministers Questions was mobbed. For the first time in months the Conservative and Unionist benches were full to overflowing. They came to bury Theresa not to praise her. They had no shame as they applauded her out of the chamber. The same people that plotted and planned to remove her from office, stood and clapped as she went. The hypocrisy and shallowness of politics really comes to the fore on such occasions. The day then became a feeding frenzy for political hacks predicting and reporting on the coming and going of cabinet members and advisers. To say that thing went from bad to worse would be the understatement of the year. I escaped the madness on the 20:35 out of London.

Thursday

The relative calm and, as always, abundant grounded common sense of my constituency office was a welcome oasis of sensibility this morning. In the afternoon I had a couple of meetings in Glasgow including one with Derek Mackay, Finance Secretary of Scotland. The latter meeting involved representatives from the Scottish Government, trade unions and local elected members. The topic of discussion was Ferguson Marine. It was heartening to hear the Scottish Governments commitment to safeguarding the jobs at the yards.

Friday

I had meeting with three local businesses covering a range of issues. Today is the first day of recess and so I shall be working out of my constituency office until parliament sits again on the 3rd of September. Recess affords me the opportunity for to catch up with local businesses, organisations and individuals and I look forward to taking that opportunity over the next few weeks.

Westminster diary w/b 15th July

Monday

I was on the order paper for questions to the Home Office.  I asked about the process that EU residents, many of whom have been in the U.K. for years, are having to go through to try and remain in the UK after Brexit. SNP MPs highlighted the case of Lizanne Zietsman, who has returned to South Africa after the Home Office ordered her to leave Britain. Lizanne has lived on the Isle of Arran since April 2015. She ran a sandwich shop with her husband. The local community supported her campaign to stay and despite a petition signed by more than 17,000, people the Home Office refused her leave to remain. The process is clearly flawed but the UK Government can’t see that or won’t admit to it.

Tuesday

My morning started with the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs select committee taking evidence on electoral law reform. It Is not as dry a subject as it sounds, especially when you consider the funding issues around the LEAVE campaign in the EU referendum and the possibility of a General Election on the horizon. I caught up with the members of the All Party Parliamentary Group on the Global Sex Trade and we discussed how to take forward our campaign to introduce the Nordic model in the UK This involves prosecuting the purchaser but decriminalising the seller. I spoke in a Westminster Hall debate on drug services. It was especially significant today as the latest drugs related deaths statistics had just been released. Scotland and Inverclyde are both particularly hard hit. While everyone that made a speech asked for a health-based approach and a change in the law to facilitate Drug Consumption Rooms (DCR), the minister responding maintained the UK government stance that DCRs encourage use. A view not shared by any country that has introduced them.

Wednesday

I started my day with an 8am breakfast meeting along with Virgin Airlines. They were keen to discuss aviation and the climate crisis while promoting a third runway at Heathrow and their allocated slots. I see a contradiction in that, but it is just the start of an on-going discussion.  Appropriately my next event was the select committee for Transport and we took evidence from the Secretary of State for Transport Chris Grayling.  That was followed by Prime Minister’s Questions. The leader of the opposition challenged the Prime Minister on the government’s climate record and she responded by accusing him of failing to stamp out racism in the Labour party. PMQs did not improve after that. The All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Drug Policy Reform (DPR) held its Annual General Meeting (AGM) at which point I was overloaded with acronyms. The group shall continue to pursue its campaigns for compassionate policies that treat problematic drug use as a health issue.

Thursday

The day started with Transport Oral questions. I bobbed but wasn’t taken so didn’t get the opportunity to ask what action the UK Government was taking to reduce toxic emissions from HGV and LGVs. I met up with representatives from GamCare. They provide training, help and support around gambling related harm. They are funded via the gambling commission who in turn are funded by a voluntary levy from the gambling industry. We disagree on a few issues but we agree that a voluntary levy is not good enough and that to allow continuity and long term support a statutory levy is a must. The late afternoon was taken up by votes and I caught the 19:35 flight home.

Friday

My office combined with Stuart McMillan MSPs office and we helped at the clean-up of the Murdieston Dam. In the afternoon I met with the Head of Policy & Public Affairs at BT Scotland. We discussed, 5G, Universal Service Obligation & EE in Inverclyde. My last meeting was with REACH for Autism.

Westminster diary w/b 8th July

Monday

It’s going to be a long week at Westminster and its starts with my 5am alarm. Most of the day is taken up by meetings and briefings and the voting started at 5pm and lasted until 8pm wit a short break when a debate broke out.

Tuesday

I start the day with debate on Active Travel. It’s a Westminster Hall debate but better attended than the main chamber. This is becoming a feature at Westminster. I make the case for cycling and walking while stressing the need for government investment. I dropped in to the Scottish Select Affairs Select Committee to listen to Joe Fitzpatrick MSP give evidence on drugs policy. Joe is the Scottish Government minister with that responsibility. I have to leave early as I have a meeting along with Carolyn Harris (Labour MP for Swansea East) with Lord Michael Grade. He is chairing a Lords Committee on gambling related harm and we are sharing our evidence gathered from our All-party parliamentary group. I then catch up with Joe in my office to share our views and discuss policy reform.

Wednesday

The Transport Select Committee had a closed door review of our future programme and our impending meeting with the Secretary of State. That is followed by Prime Minister’s Questions. It is till notable for the sparse attendance of the government MPs and there sudden support for their Prime Minister now that they have forced her out. The All-party parliamentary group on gambling related harm took evidence from clinical experts and members of GamCare around the funding and provision of support for people with gambling addictions. I then spoke in another well attended Westminster hall debate. This one was on HS2. Ten billion pounds spent, ten years since it was first announced and not one mile of new track. It’s an infrastructure project that has gone massively wrong.

Thursday

I have an 8:30 meeting with representatives of William Hill. While I am pursuing a mandatory levy on bookmakers and I am critical of some aspects of the gambling industry, I am always open to hear their views and their solutions in areas that we agree. This was followed by an internal trading course run with House of Commons staff. These courses are extremely well prepared and are part of on-going training to make sure that MPs are good employers and that we understand our role and the responsibility it brings. I finish the working day by talking in a debate in the main chamber on 20 years of devolution. It was a good debate but rather tainted by the usual suspects that make their speech and then feel the need to constantly intervene on others. This takes time away from the speakers at the end of the list. So for that reason I refused all interventions.

Friday

A beautiful sunny day in inverclyde and I took advantage of that by holding street surgeries and distributing contact details to households.

 

Westminster diary w/b 1st July

Monday

I met with Liz Karter in Portcullis House to discuss gambling related harm therapy. Liz is an expert in this area and we had a long and informative conversation. The big five bookmakers have bowed to pressure and have offered to increase their contributions to offset gambling related harm. The offer is much more than they currently pay but it’s not mandatory and it’s still not enough. However now that there will be more money available the conversation is about how best to use that money. I was in the Chamber for questions to the Department for Work and Pensions and I hoped to get in in topical questions but it didn’t happen.

Tuesday

I sat in on the Scottish Affairs Select committee session as it was taking evidence from people I know in the drug policy reform movement. It was a fascinating session and received a lot of media coverage. The witnesses are experts that have travelled into Westminster to provide evidence at the request of the committee so it was extremely disappointing to watch some committee members spend the session on their mobile devices reading. Sitting on two select committees I often search for information during a session if its not in the briefing but that’s not what I was watching unfold during this session. It was disrespectful and totally unwarranted. In the afternoon I again took on the role of observer and watched the Health Select committee take evidence from a different set of witnesses on the same subject. It was not as good a session. In between these sessions I replied to a government statement on the big 5 bookmakers proposal to offer more money, but not mandatory, for gambling related harm. I described it as a bribe.

Wednesday

The Select Committee on Transport took evidence on pavement parking. It is set to be banned in Scotland but enforcing it in areas where the roads are too narrow for emergency services, when cars are not parked on the pavements is going to be problematic. Prime Ministers Questions was a dour uninspiring affair. I met with Henrietta Bowden-Jones to discuss her opinions on how gambling related harm should be funded and provided. She is an expert in this area and already runs a clinic in Fulham. We also discovered a mutual appreciation of art. I dropped in to an event hosted by Scottish Water to hear about their role in renewable energies. I was heartened to hear how much they knew about Inverclyde and our possibilities for hydro power. My flight was delayed but I made it back home for 10pm.

Thursday

I met with constituents in the morning and spoke to Radio Clyde regarding William Hill and the proposed closure of several bookmakers. In the afternoon I delivered contacts details to local houses and held street surgeries.

Friday

I started by meeting BayWa, they are the new owners of Forsa Energy’s renewables business that was located at Pottery Street. The afternoon was consumed by surgeries in my constituency office.