Tele column – 16th March 2018

It is like something out of a novel. An ex Russian spy is poisoned. We don’t know by whom and we don’t know how. But that doesn’t stop the media sensationalism of the story. Initially local police attended the scene but that has escalated to personnel in large, bright, protective suits and we now have armed military personnel at and around the scene. What a soldier armed with an automatic rifle is supposed to do when confronted by an airborne nerve gas I do not know. If they are there to make the local populace feel safer, then someone has to redefine the threat. The Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov says Russia has no connection to the poisoning of former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in Salisbury. The Russian authorities have asked for a sample of the poison and we have refused. And amidst all the headlines and theories we have a strange conundrum. Both the UK and USA have officially said they think Russia is involved but hinted that it may not have been Government sanctioned. Sergei Skripal was a double agent. I am no expert but I am guessing that he has a few enemies. So while the media focuses on Salisbury thousands are killed in Syria by Russian bombing raids. They aren’t as intriguing as the assassination of a spy and they aren’t as close to home as Salisbury but they along with the Turkish offensive against the Kurds is where we should be taking Russia to task. While the attacks on Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia are appalling that does not excuse us from ignoring the atrocities that are being perpetrated on the people of Syria and the attempted genocide of the Kurdish people. But then again the U.K. is embroiled in the Middle East and a long hard look at that situation may shine a light on our misjudgements and the consequences to thousands of nameless victims. It’s much safer to focus on what looks like a plot from a 1960s movie and portray Russia as all bad and Britain as the good guy in all its red, white and blue glory.

 

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